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Posts Tagged ‘Mosaic’

From the roof of my condo complex in a sunny part of San Francisco, I can see solar panels on at least a few houses on each surrounding block.

Yet solar for our condo has eluded us. When it comes to solar, condos — with multiple owners and HOA regulations — are a tough nut to crack. I’m determined to get us solar power someday, but the jury is out on when that day will come.

While I’m interested in solar for environmental reasons, most people go solar simply to save money — which is how I’ll have to sell it at my condo. After all, most of us can’t afford solar power for altruistic reasons alone. It has to make financial sense.

Yet while more people are becoming aware of the financial benefits of solar, most still can’t participate in those benefits. That’s because 75% of us don’t own our roof or have a roof suitable for solar. My condo is just one example of the many barriers to going solar for the 75%.

That’s where Mosaic comes in. It’s part of a community power movement that’s providing more opportunities for the 75% to go solar. Community power aims to decentralize clean electricity generation and make it accessible to all. As solar and other renewables become more available and affordable, the hope is that ordinary consumers of that power will benefit, rather than big companies outside their communities.

But many community power options rely on policy changes that are slow to come. A growing number of people are tired of waiting and are taking matters into their own hands to make solar projects happen. Crowdfunding has emerged as a simple and powerful way to allow the 75% to take action by investing directly in solar. With crowdfunding, even people who can’t get solar on their own roof can participate by pooling their dollars to support solar.

Till now, most crowdfunding models have been about making donations to fund solar projects. That’s great if you’re looking for a worthy charity. And it’s true that solar benefits everyone, even if it’s not on your own roof. But what if you want to reap the benefits of solar in a more direct way? Mosaic provides that opportunity with a new model that lets people invest in solar projects and get a solid return.

Is solar is worth investing in? Take a cue from Warren Buffett, whose recent purchase of two solar plants sent stocks soaring. Of course, most of us can’t afford a whole solar plant. The good news is that now, you don’t need to be a millionaire to invest in solar. One of Mosaic’s first projects is providing investors a hefty 6.4% return, and some of them ponied up as little as $25.

That’s what’s so exciting about Mosaic. With a low barrier to entry, Mosaic is bringing solar and its benefits within the reach of regular people like you and me. For me, this means I don’t have to wait to get solar on my condo. I can invest now in Mosaic and be part of bringing solar to communities, and even get a return on my investment. Finally, I’ll have a real stake in solar. Finally, I’ll get some direct benefits, without needing to put panels on my roof. Finally, I’ll be able to do well while doing good.

Now, that’s what I call solar for the 75%.

This post was originally published at Mosaic.

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BHP_coal_admits_climate_change_0We hold these truths to be self-evident: that fossil fuels cause climate change and the extreme weather we’ve been seeing — and that the world needs to wake up and kick the fossil fuel habit.

Sure, those of us who call ourselves environmentalists take those as truths, but a major coal company? Yet that’s exactly what the Australian BHP Billiton, the world’s largest mining company, has just copped to.

Explaining the company’s decision to retrofit one if its coal-exporting facilities against significant weather events, BHP Billiton executive Marcus Randolph was quoted as saying, “As we see more cyclone-related events … the vulnerability of one of these facilities to a cyclone is quite high. So we built a model saying this is how we see this impacting what the economics would be and used that with our board of directors to rebuild the facility to be more durable to climate change.”

Yes, you read that right: climate change.You gotta love the irony. Not only is this major coal company acknowledging that climate change is real, but they’re investing in protections against the effects of said climate change — which they helped cause. They’re making a significant investment to protect themselves — from themselves.

At what point will a company like this decide that the costs of producing coal and other fossil fuels are no longer worth the return on investment? Weak prices have already led some coal companies, including BHP Billiton, to cut jobs. Add to this the cost of protecting their facilities from storms, and the ROI diminishes even more.

And there are other costs, as we’ve seen recently with Superstorm Sandy. We can’t put a value on people’s lives, the damage to communities, and the emotional effects of the storm. In pure financial terms, though, Sandy could cost $50 billion. What amount of retrofitting would it take to make cities like New York safe? Won’t we get a better ROI by investing in prevention?

Prevention would mean moving from fossil fuels to renewables. And Randolph seems to agree that we must at least limit fossil fuels. Referring to Australia’s carbon tax, he says, “there is not a qualifier saying it is okay to emit more greenhouse gases if the carbon tax is eliminated. An absolute ceiling is an absolute ceiling. Even if there isn’t a carbon tax, it still needs to be an issue we devote a lot of attention to.”

Randolph has even gone so far as to state, “In a carbon constrained world where energy coal is the biggest contributor to a carbon problem, how do you think this is going to evolve over a 30- to 40-year time horizon? You’d have to look at that and say on balance, I suspect, the usage of thermal coal is going to decline. And frankly it should.”

Strong words from a major contributor to the “carbon problem.” Why is BHP Billiton taking this position? Because climate change is affecting what the company cares about the most: their bottom line. Their main concern is profitability. Climate change is a threat to profits. So they’re doing what any sensible hard-nosed ballsy capitalist would do: they’re protecting their profits by investing in more durable facilities.

Could that same concern for profits lead beyond protecting against the effects of climate change to actually trying to prevent it? Maybe the lesson for environmentalists and policy makers is to understand what motivates fossil fuel companies. Forget about appealing to a green economy, solving world energy needs, and so forth. Tell them climate change is going to rob you blind unless you invest against it. And that means first admitting that climate change is real — real enough to affect your profits and maybe even put you out of business.

Randolph’s statements, and the company’s actions, are already making news — and they’re sure to make waves. If a large coal company like this one acknowledges the effects of fossil fuels, who are the climate deniers to turn to? Perhaps it’s time they faced reality and started working to reverse climate change. Perhaps concern for profits will force them to do so.

Looking to invest against climate change? Check out MosaicSunfunderRE-volvThe San Francisco Energy Co-op, and Everybody Solar.

This post was originally published on Mosaic.

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